podcast

Passport to the World: ¡Viva Mexico!

In recent years, the "Passport to the World" program has taken UK to South Africa, China, and Russia, and will celebrate its fourth year by focusing on MexicoProfessors Francie Chassen-Lopez (History) and Chris Pool (Anthropology) are teaming up to coordinate and plan this year’s activities. In this podcast, they talk about what makes Mexico unique and what sorts of events to look for in the coming year. 

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

 

Durante los últimos  años, el programa “Passport to the World” a llevado a UK a países como Sur África, China y Rusia. Este año, “Passport to the World” nos llevará a México. Los profesores Francie Chassen-Lopez (History) y Chris Pool (Anthropology) unieron fuerzas para coordinar y planear las actividades de este ano. En este podcast, Chris y Francie nos cuentan sobre aspectos únicos de México, así como también nos familiarizan con el tipo de actividades que se realizarán durante el año.

Este podcast fue producido por Cheyenne Hohman.

 

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Opening New Doors: Debdas Mukerjee

University of Kentucky alumni Debdas Mukerjee graduated in 1962 with his Ph.D. in genetics. After UK, Mukerjee contributed his expertise to the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center before his career finally carried him to the Environmental Protection Agency where he was a Senior Environmental Health Scientist for the United States. 

All of this was not Mukerjee's plan but he found that both the University of Kentucky and the state itself opened the doors of America to him in way he would never have imagined. In this podcast, Mukerjee reminisces on his "innumerable" memories at UK and gives some advice to current students so that they too can get the most from their academic experience. 
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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War and Peace in Russia's Realms: A&S 100 with Karen Petrone

Later this spring, Professor Karen Petrone will begin teaching a new 7-week class as part of this year's Passport to the World Program: Reimagining Russia’s Realms. The class, A&S: 100 - War & Peace in Russia's Realms will explore the Russian and Soviet experience of World War I, the Russian Civil War, and World War II through literature, film, and history. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to discover Russian author Leo Tolstoy’s surprisingly influential role in the development of the non-violent resistance movement.

Petrone, the chair of the Department of History, hopes to help students analyze how Russian memories of past wars shape the country today. This topic is one Petrone is already quite familiar with—so much so in fact she's written a book on the subject: The Great War in Russian Memory.
 
The course also offers a unique opportunity for students to learn about Russia's past through its connection to a series of other classes and a play that students will have the opportunity to see at the end of the semester. 
 
A&S 100 - War & Peace in Russia's Realms begins this coming March 5th and interested students will have until March 11th to sign up.
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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Hail To The Chief

This year, Martin Luther King Day will also mark the re-inauguration of President Barack Obama. His first inauguration brought more than 2 million people to the National Mall four years ago; this year, the event is expected to attract hundreds of thousands. Tracy Campbell, a History professor and Co-Director of the Wendell H Ford Public Policy Research Center, joined us by phone to discuss American presidential inaugurations and how they have changed over time.

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

 

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Cosmos and Computers: Gary Ferland discusses infrastructure upgrades for studying space.

The University of Kentucky recently announced big upgrades to its supercomputing infrastructure. This means more power for researchers across the campus working on some of the questions that have puzzled us the longest. 

One such researcher is Professor Gary Ferland of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Since the late 1970s, he’s been using computer modeling software to carry out experiments that would otherwise be impossible. With his widely used program Cloudy which simulates clouds of interstellar matter out in space and UK’s high-tech supercomputing infrastructure, Ferland and his students have been able to help answer some of the biggest questions facing astronomers as well as society.
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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Treatments Can Ease Severe Aches, Pain of Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia causes pain that can be felt in muscles, joint and even skin. Although it is the most common musculoskeletal condition after osteoarthritis, it is often misunderstood and misdiagnosed.

Academic Intellect and Military Intelligence: Phil Marcum

From the Bluegrass State to the far corners of the world, an A&S education is a solid foundation for any future. After completing a degree in History in 1968, Phil Marcum moved into a career with the U.S. Military that spanned thirty years. In this podcast, he describes the skills he learned in college that carried him through his career in military intelligence.

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

 

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Following the Campaign Trail: Currents Fall 2012

Fall of 2012 was the perfect time to conduct a class about American electoral politics - so it was taken up as the topic for Currents, a class offered to incoming Freshmen. The course explores the 2012 election from a variety of academic perspectives - including, but not limited to, philosophy, economics, history, and, of course, political science. In this podcast, five Currents students shared their experiences with the class. 

The students interviewed are: Trevor McNary, a double major in International Studies and Economics with a minor in Arabic and Islamic Studies; Jonathan Burdick, a Chemistry major; Elisabeth Campbell, a double major in Russian and Political Science with a minor in Spanish; Kevin States, a double major in marketing & management; and Kyle Richardson, a Political Science major. 

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

 

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A Layered Look: Alumna Audrey Rooney

Audrey Rooney received a doctoral degree from the Department of History in 1997. Her dissertation was a biography of the Ottonian cathedral of St. Mauritius in Magdeburg, Germany, and her research prior to that included a variety of subjects within art history, including studying the drawings beneath frescoes. In this podcast, Rooney reflects on her experiences as a doctoral student and researcher, and how the University of Kentucky is a cultural resource for students and community members alike. 

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman and edited by Sam Burchett. Our alumni correspondent, Lauren Kidd, conducted the interview.

 

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New Faculty 2012: Meet Scott Taylor

The Department of History is excited to welcome professor Scott Taylor to its faculty!

Professor Taylor joins us this fall researching the history of early modern Europe, especially Spain. Currently, he is working on a book on the beginnings of modern addiction, examining how western Europeans experienced "soft drugs" like sugar, tobacco, chocolate, coffee, tea, distilled spirits, and opium.

This podcast is part of a series highlighting the new faculty members who joined the College of Arts and Sciences in the fall 2012 semester.

Produced by Stephen Gordinier.

 

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