modern and classical languages

Wicked Souls and Bodies: Evil Spirits, Sexuality, Gender, and Violence in the Lore of the African Diaspora

While the African diaspora generally describes the dispersal(s) of African-descended peoples throughout the world from modernity to the present, it demands the sighting of various contexts, causes, results, and memories.  This symposium’s focus on the African diaspora as articulated a transatlantic contexts provides a platform that underscores diversity and the human condition in a national and transnational manner. The cultural, linguistic, ethnic/racial, and generational dynamics of the Black Atlantic provide a fruitful intellectual context for exploring the roles of problematic acts of agency in oppressive spaces.
 
This mini-symposium examines folktales and folktale-like stories as sites of both abjection and healing.  This symposium will study stories that illustrate how individuals protect their identity and bodily integrity. We will discover how storytellers from the Americas have responded to the effect of colonization and colonialism through oral and literary works that underscore the cultural and psychological characteristics as well as the resilience of their communities. Presenters will examine the carnal violence and brutality associated with sex and gender in folktales and fairytales from the Americas. In so doing, this mini-symposium will put European and African folklore in conversation with the New World’s oral and literary traditions. For instance, in French Caribbean lore, whenever one speaks about evil spirits, one speaks about pacts with the devil and magical practices for white or black magic. Syncretic re-appropriations of Catholicism are often at the heart of measures taken against evil practices. In addition, the nocturnal violation of female bodies by male evil spirits (incubi) resembles the supernatural assault tradition called cauchemar or witch-riding in southwest Louisiana. The Caribbean vampire is often an old woman (a soucougnant or soucouyant) who, at night, suckspeople’s bloodseeking vital energy and, in so doing, recalling the West African witch. Moreover, the consequences of sexual violence do not spare men either.  In French Caribbean folklore, the diablesse (She-devil) often eats men’s hearts while succubi (or other devil spawns) petrify them to death. The dialogues between the various spaces are intriguing to say the least.
 
Rationale for the conference
 
 
Globalization in the twenty-first century has both exposed and increased tensions around the construction of diverse communities. Now, more ever, the world’s great variety and diversity prompt heated discussions pertaining to class, race/ethnicity, nationality, gender/sex, urban/rural, religious affiliation, etc. Each of these societal categories —along with the others— enhances the ways that students, faculty, administration and staff see and envision themselves as part of this vibrant and productive community that is the University of Kentucky. 
 
To foster campus dialogue within Arts & Sciences and beyond, to promote the critical study of community building, and to open new perspectives in discussions around selfhood and otherness, the “Wicked Souls” intends to be a mini-symposium that deploys Caribbean studies and particularly folktales and marvelous stories and their connections to religious or spiritual practices as a platform to explore how communities see others and envision themselves. Indeed, in the French Caribbean, for instance, whenever one speaks about evil spirits, one speaks about pacts with the devil and Quimbois (magical practices for white or black magic; also considered as medicinal and healing practices). Catholicism (or syncretic re-appropriation of it) is at the heart of measures taken against evil practices. As a part of the implementation of the University Strategic plan for Diversity and Internationalization, this symposium aims to increase the profile of Caribbean and Black Atlantic Diasporic Cultures here at the University of Kentucky and inform colleagues beyond our walls of this growing field of inquiry on our campus.
 
Some of the questions this mini-symposium will address include:
 
       gender and race relationships in colonial and postcolonial societies.
       the historical and cultural contexts that have contributed to the formation of the lore of the African Diaspora in the Americas.
       how the eroticized bodies bears traces of its social, political and cultural codification.
       the relationship of domination, power and violence between men and women in the Americas.
       religious and spiritual practices in diasporic spaces
       challenge dominant ideologies about what folklore means in the Americas.
       explore notions of self, gender, race and ethnicity as shifting social constructs while studying the male and female body as a reflection of colonial  and postcolonial societies in the Caribbean.
 
It is within this framework that this symposium considers theories associated with psychoanalytic and fairytales studies, postcolonial studies, and trauma studies as ways of conceiving and analyzing the construction of intercultural and diverse communities. Though presenters will examine stories from the African Diaspora, members of the audience will also be invited to ponder the extent to which trauma born out of colonial rule has impacted inhabitants of the Caribbean and the Americas, irrespective of gender or ethnicity.
Date: 
Wednesday, February 3, 2016 - 5:00pm to 7:00pm
Location: 
ine Arts Library, Study Room 1 (upstairs)

International Studies Day

Date: 
Friday, May 1, 2015 - 11:30am to 7:00pm
Location: 
Student Center 211

UK Confucius Institute Brings Exhibit, Symposium With Focus on Jewish Refugees in Shanghai

An exhibition and symposium at the University of Kentucky will explore the experience of Jewish refugees in China.

French Studies Forum on the Paris Attacks

The University of Kentucky recently hosted a French Studies Forum on the Paris Attacks, organized by French and Francophone Studies within the Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Cultures.

The participants in the forum address the cultural and political context of, as well as the emerging and continuing fallout surrounding, the recent deadly attacks on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo and a Paris kosher market (January 7-9, 2015).

Discussion participants (in the order in which they speak):
Jeffrey Peters, French and Francophone Studies (MCLLC)
Leon Sachs, French and Francophone Studies (MCLLC)
Jeremy Popkin, Department of History
Suzanne Pucci, French and Francophone Studies (MCLLC)
Michael Samers, Department of Geography
Sadia Zoubir-Shaw, French and Francophone Studies (MCLLC)
Ihsan Bagby, Arabic and Islamic Studies (MCLLC)
Joel Pett, political cartoonist, Lexington Herald-Leader

This podcast was produced by Casey Hibbard

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French Studies Forum on the Paris Attacks by UK College of Arts & Sciences is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Paris Attacks Topic of Public Forum

Today, a unique group of University of Kentucky professors and Pulitzer Prize-winning political cartoonist Joel Pett are leading a discussion of the recent terrorist attacks in Paris.

Office Hours With Brenna Byrd And Anastasia Curwood

Our latest episode of Office Hours is here! In this session, Professors Brenna Byrd and Anastasia Curwood join us to discuss their teaching, research, and interests. Professor Byrd leads off with a discussion of German culture and Turkish-German hip-hop while Professor Curwood explores her recent research regarding Shirley Chisholm. The two professors discover their common interests -- forms of social resistance, feminism, language, and identity and discuss them from two very different perspectives.

Office Hours is produced by the College of Arts & Sciences and airs on WRFL FM 88.1 every Wednesday from 2-3 p.m.

This podcast was produced by Casey Hibbard.

Creative Commons License
Office Hours With Brenna Byrd And Anastasia Curwood by UK College of Arts & Sciences is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Effects of Secession: UK Professors on Historic and Cultural Contexts of Ukraine

University of Kentucky professors Karen Petrone and Jeanmarie Rouhier-Willoughby have helped bring a distinctly Russian flavor to UK. In addition to their departments, they are both a part of the Russian Studies program and helped organize 2012's Russian-themed Passport to the World events.

Here, the professors give us a brief history of Ukraine and Russia, including glimpses at the origins of their international relationship and the current thought processes of their most effective demographics.

This podcast was recorded by Brian Connors Manke and produced by David Cole.

Creative Commons License
Effects of Secession: UK Professors on Historic and Cultural Contexts of Ukraine by UK College of Arts & Sciences is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

New Challenges for Peace and Security in East Asia: Perspectives on Japan’s Future

Under the leadership of Prime Minister Abe, the Japanese government is proactively working to solve the major challenges Japan faces. Consul-General Kato discusses these challenges and outlines Japan’s path forward to prosperity.

Consul-General Motohiko Kato arrived to Consulate-General of Japan in Nashville in October 2012 by way of Manila, where he most recently served as Deputy Chief of Mission of the Japanese Embassy in the Philippines. A career diplomat, he entered the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA) in 1982 after passing Japan’s foreign-service examination. Consul-General Kato’s primary mission is to care for Japanese citizens in their families residing in the Southeast, protect the interests of Japanese companies, and promote Japanese culture and business throughout these five states. 

Date: 
Tuesday, November 12, 2013 - 12:30pm to 1:45pm
Location: 
Student Center Room 211

College of Arts and Sciences Invites All to Reimagine Russia's Realms

The UK College of Arts and Sciences has launched the third chapter in its Passport to the World Initiative, opening doors for students to "reimagine Russia's realms."

David Crabbe

David Crabbe, a graduate student in the Division of Classics in the Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures has been awarded the Swift-Longacre-Scaife Fellowship for academic year 2012-13, in the amount of $6,000. The award was made in recognition both of what David had already accomplished in the Classics program and for his outstanding promise as a career Latin teacher.
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