News

12/14/2012

Six University of Kentucky professors have recently been named recipients of the UK Alumni Association 2013 Great Teacher Award.

The recipients are:

Karen Badger, associate professor, College of Social Work Dr. Roberta Dwyer, professor, College of Agriculture Samuel Franklin, assistant professor, College of Medicine John Grove, professor, College of Agriculture Armando Prats, professor, College of Arts & Sciences Gerald Smith, associate professor, College of Arts & Sciences

The recipients will be honored at the UK Alumni Association Great Teacher Award Recognition Dinner on Feb. 5, 2013. They will then be honored on center court of Rupp Arena during the South Carolina vs. Kentucky men’s basketball game later that

12/11/2012

by Whitney Hale

Over the summer a team of faculty and students from University of Kentucky discovered evidence of not just one lost community, but two in northern Italy. Using their archaeological expertise and modern technology, data was collected indicating the existence of a Roman settlement and below that, a possible prehistoric site.

Many years ago, archaeologist and art historian Paolo Visonà, a native of northern Italy and adjunct associate professor of art history in the UK School of Art and Visual Studies at the UK College of Fine Arts, first learned of a possible ancient settlement from a farmer in Valbruna, near the village of Tezze di Arzignano. While

12/10/2012

by Carl Nathe

University of Kentucky doctoral candidate and Letcher County native Amanda Fickey is the recipient of a research fellowship from the Central Appalachian Institute in Research and Development (CAIRD).  CAIRD is a nonprofit, public policy organization, which provides long-term educational and economic developmental strategies in order to establish vibrant and sustainable communities that will improve the quality of life for citizens of central Appalachia.  Fickey will serve as a fellow-in-residence for a year-long appointment in 2013.  CAIRD is located in the heart of the Central Appalachian region in Pikeville.

"We are delighted to have a person of Amanda's talent and proven research background helping us in the coming year," said Jason Belcher, CEO of CAIRD.  "Her combination of scholarly achievement and work experience in Appalachia is ideally

11/26/2012

by Whitney Hale & Tess Perica

Information in this day and age is rarely scarce, but often not collected and saved properly for future generations. However, one national project under the leadership of oral historian Doug Boyd, director of the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at University of Kentucky Libraries, hopes to remedy that through the dissemination of best practices via the Oral History in the Digital Age (OHDA).

Funded by the Institute of Museum and Library

11/9/2012

by Whitney Hale & Courtney Quinn

The University of Kentucky Libraries Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center will present a lecture by William H. Chafe, author of "Bill and Hillary: The Politics of the Personal" and the Alice Mary Baldwin Professor of History, Emeritus, at Duke University. The lecture, which is free and open to the public, will be presented at 3 p.m. Monday, Nov. 12, in the 18th floor conference room of Patterson Office Tower.

Chafe is the author of 13 books, including pioneering works on women’s history, civil rights history, and American political history. At Duke, he co-founded

11/7/2012

by Sarah Geegan

This semester, students at the University of Kentucky are learning about American leadership and democracy as it unfolds.

An interactive course, "UKC 180: America Through the Lens of the 2012 Election," utilizes an innovative classroom design and extensive multi-media resources to focus on the upcoming presidential election. Through lectures, guest speakers, in-class polls, group work in "caucuses" and interaction with real congressional staffers, students are gaining a deeper understanding of American politics, and addressing relevant issues in real time.

Mark Lawrence Kornbluh, dean of the UK College of Arts and Sciences, and

10/24/2012

By Sarah Geegan

This semester, students within the College of Arts and Sciences are learning about American democracy as it unfolds.

An interactive course, "UKC 180: America Through the Lens of the 2012 Election," utilizes an innovative classroom design and extensive multi-media resources to focus on the upcoming presidential election. Through lectures, guest speakers, in-class polls, group work in "caucuses" and interaction with real congressional staffers, students are gaining a deeper understanding of American politics, and addressing relevant issues in real time.

College of Arts and Sciences Dean, Mark Lawrence Kornbluh and History professor

10/15/2012

by Sarah Geegan

 

In the 2008 election, young Americans voted in their largest numbers since the 1970s. With the 2012 election around the corner, the UK College of Arts and Sciences, with the support of the Department of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Media (WRD) will present several events for UK students to become more informed about the election, specifically surrounding the second presidential debate.

A faculty panel, consisting of political science Professor Stephen Vosshistory Professor Paul

10/15/2012

From being a walk-on with the undefeated 1971-72 freshman basketball team, to working with the Supreme Court, and now as the President and CEO of the Freedom Forum, which oversees the Newseum and First Amendment Center is Washington D.C. - Jim Duff's resume is as diverse as and A&S education. No wonder he is being inducted into the A&S Hall of Fame this week!

The Herald-Leader recently covered Duff's career - read more.
 

 

10/10/2012

 

A faculty panel will discuss relevant election issues on the night of the debate. The following night, various faculty, lecturers and graduate students will lead group discussions for students, using video clips from the previous night's debate.

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 10, 2012) — In the 2008 election, young Americans voted in their largest numbers since the 1970's. With the 2012 election around the corner, the UK College of Arts and Sciences, with the support of the Department of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Media (WRD) will present several events for UK students to become more informed about the election, specifically surrounding the second presidential debate.

A faculty panel, consisting of political science

10/8/2012

by Sarah Geegan

 

The UK College of Arts and Sciences has launched the third chapter in its Passport to the World Initiative, opening doors for students to "reimagine Russia's realms."

Proceeding from the college's years of South Africa and China, the year of Russia, "Reimagining Russia's Realms" amounts to a year-long exploration of culture and history that shaped Russia and the many other homelands of Eurasia. The initiative provides opportunities for the UK and Lexington community to learn about Russia and its neighbors in a multidisciplinary way, through events that range in focus from literature and history, to politics and the environment.

Jeanmarie Rouhier-

10/3/2012

by Sarah Geegan 

 The UK Confucius Institute has partnered with the Headley-Whitney Museum to present contemporary art, fashioned in a centuries-old style.

The exhibition, “Realized in Wood: Contemporary Prints from China,” features 10 artists' woodblock prints, a traditional style that dates back to the Han Dynasty, prior to A.D. 220. The technique involves artists cutting away the background of an image into a block of wood with a chisel, knife or sandpaper, and then covering the block in ink and pressing it to paper or cloth.

Woodblock prints have provided a window into Chinese culture throughout history. Particularly in the 20th century, the wide range of

9/10/2012

by Whitney Hale

Last spring, Teach for America selected 27 recent graduates of the University of Kentucky to serve in America's inner cities and rural communities. The UK group, the largest in school history, is among 5,800 new corps members selected for Teach for America, a national program in which outstanding college graduates commit to teach for two years in disadvantaged urban and rural public schools.

Teach for America places its recruits in the nation's highest-need elementary and secondary schools in many of the country's lowest income communities, both rural and urban, in an effort to close the achievement gap between economically advantaged and disadvantaged children.

This year’s corps is the largest in Teach for America’s history.

9/4/2012

by Sarah Geegan

 

Paul Chamberlin, professor in the UK Department of History, was featured in The New York Times today; his op-ed coincides with the 40th anniversary of the Munich Olympics massacre.

Chamberlin describes the massacre as, for most Westerners, "the most chilling example of international terrorism before 9/11." Palestinian militants killed 11 members of the Israeli Olympic team. Chamberlin argues that this incident and the lessons learned from it played an intricate role in shaping American views on terrorism for the next four decades.

"I argue that, despite the violence, some Palestinian

8/28/2012

 

by Whitney Hale

 

The University of Kentucky Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History and the Oldham County History Center announce the establishment of a formal partnership to archive, preserve and support ongoing oral history initiatives created by the Oldham County History Center in LaGrange, Ky.

The Oldham County History Center has been collecting oral histories since 2001, including interviews with veterans of World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War as well as the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Many of these interviews have been transcribed and published in the Oldham County Neighborhood section of the Louisville Courier-Journal. In 2007, the Oldham County History Center began an

8/13/2012

History Professor Hang Nguyen recently published an op ed piece on Vietnam in the Sunday New York Times Opinion Section. Her article discusses myths about the Vietnam War and how the war compares to the current and lengthy conflict in Afghanistan. To read the full article, follow the link to the online edition of the New York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/12/opinion/sunday/what-we-dont-know-about-vietnam-can-still-hurt-us.html?_r=1

5/30/2012

 

By Sarah Geegan

"Every time I take a trip, I find myself missing home. The people. The culture. The weather," says JR Leach, a triple-major in political sciencehistory and Hispanic studies, who is currently studying in Granada, Spain.

But he is not referring to Lexington.

"I've travelled internationally before and for extended periods of time, and I've always remembered and missed what most people would consider my home in America," Leach said. "But Granada is where all cards are off. Granada has become my home."

Studying through the International Study Abroad program (ISA) throughout the spring 2012 semester, Leach, a student in the Honors

5/29/2012
flags

By Sarah Geegan, Amanda Osborn

 

Imagine being a University of Kentucky student in Lexington, but sharing a "global classroom" with students in China, France or India.  In collaboration with the associate provost for International Affairs and the Center for the Enhancement of Learning and Teaching (CELT), the UK College of Arts and Sciences recently established a program called Global Classroom Connections that will promote international learning and experiences through the use of contemporary technology.

As university graduates increasingly require international perspectives, skills and knowledge to succeed in the multicultural and interconnected world, Global Classroom

5/9/2012
jeremy popkin

 

By Sarah Geegan

University of Kentucky history Professor Jeremy Popkin was recently appointed a fellowship for the 2012-13 academic year by the National Humanities Center.

More than $1.5 million in individual fellowship grants will allow scholars to take a yearlong leave from their regular academic duties to pursue research at the center, located in North Carolina. Popkin is one of 33 fellows who will have the opportunity to work on an individual research project and share ideas in seminars, lectures and conferences.

“The National Humanities Center is an ideal environment for scholars,” Popkin said. “It is set up to encourage the exchange of ideas.”

Popkin will spend the year researching how the

4/20/2012

 

By Jonathon Spalding

University of Kentucky history professor, Jeremy Popkin, was recently appointed a fellowship for the 2012-13 academic year by the National Humanities Center.

“The National Humanities Center is an ideal environment for scholars,” Popkin said, “It is set up to encourage the exchange of ideas.”

More than $1,500,000 in individual fellowship grants will allow scholars to take a yearlong leave from their regular academic duties to pursue research at the center, located in North Carolina. Popkin is one of 33 fellows who will have the opportunity to work on an individual research project and share their ideas in seminars, lectures and conferences.

“I’m looking forward to the rare opportunity to spend a year thinking and writing about a problem that has intrigued me since I was an undergraduate,” Popkin said.

Popkin

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